Rusko @ Warehouse Live

12:00 am by

Rusko @ Warehouse Live

Whether you like it or not, dubstep is evolving into one of the most popular genres among younger electronic music fans. This statement became even more evident at the sold-out Rusko (Christopher Mercer) concert at Warehouse Live. He is one of the driving forces bringing dubstep more into the mainstream.

Read all about the show after the jump

Words and photos by Marcus “Cheese Grits” Handy

During the hour it took to get through security, I was intrigued, but often thoroughly annoyed, by many of the other concertgoers in line. The amount of “influence” these minors, ravers, and frat boys were under was obnoxious. If you’ve seen the 1995 cult classic film “Kids”, you know what I’m talking about. In my opinion, the event should have been 18+, but it very well might not have sold out. The plus side was never having to wait at the bar.

Rusko @ Warehouse Live

Once we were inside, my senses were overloaded with synth, bass, vibrations, and strobe lights. The two opening DJs were the calm before the fast approaching storm. The first DJ came from the Gritsy crew, but I didn’t catch his name. Next, Doorly amped up the audience with an array of hip hop, jungle, and house remixes. His mix of Lil Wayne’s “6 Foot 7 Foot” at the end of the set definitely riled a few people up. Still, it was quite obvious what we were all waiting for. Once Doorly wrapped up and the crew revealed Rusko’s name spelled out in flashing light bulbs, you could sense the crowd’s accelerating pulse (and not just from the drugs). Just after 12:15 am, Rusko ascended on to his platform, and the craziness officially began. With hit songs such as “Hold On”, “Woo Boost”, “Everyday”, “Come Ere N Say That”, and their equally energetic corresponding remixes, his nearly two-hour, full-blown dubstep dance party kept everyone’s feet moving. The countless heavy bass drops, sound effects, wobbly rhythms, and tempo changes didn’t hurt either. He even dropped Doctor P’s remix of the Tetris theme, which quickly became a crowd favorite.

Rusko @ Warehouse Live

Rusko’s overlying goal is to bring the audience’s energy level as high as his (or as close as possible), and he undeniably succeeded. You can’t help but find his vigor and sprightly personality infectious. At any given moment throughout the performance, you could catch him interacting with the crowd or dancing uncontrollably. All of this led to one of the sweatiest and most outrageous shows I’ve been to in some time, but I expected nothing less. Although the younger audience was not necessarily my cup of tea, I appreciate performances like this. I’d say everyone left satisfied, sore, and possibly weighing a pound or two less.


Rusko @ Warehouse Live

Rusko @ Warehouse Live

Rusko @ Warehouse Live

Rusko @ Warehouse Live

Rusko @ Warehouse Live

Rusko @ Warehouse Live